Firms Share Their Biggest Recruitment Strategy Mistakes

What is the biggest brand mistake in your firm’s recruitment strategy? We asked this question in a recent AAM (Association for Accounting Marketing) High webinar and received the following responses:
57% said “Recruitment is an afterthought in the marketing strategy.”
14% said “Partners aren’t involved in the interview or onboarding process.”
17% said “No career pages online or minimal content.”
11% said “Specific charity or community involvement isn’t promoted publicly.”

The sentiment was very similar at an SMPS Twin Cities education program, “Talent Management: How to Attract, Train and Retain Top Talent.” A panel of HR and talent experts representing architecture, engineering and construction stressed the importance of integrating marketing and HR, involving leadership and promoting the firm’s positive qualities.

Here’s why you need to adjust your recruitment strategy if these mistakes are happening at your firm.

Recruitment is an afterthought in the marketing strategy.
Your firm is seeking qualified candidates so it looks to HR to fill the positions. But think about how qualified candidates learn about your firm. It’s not just an HR issue; it’s a marketing issue first that flows into the HR process. The two should work hand-in-hand. At Ingenuity, we forecast that in the coming years, a marketer will be dedicated to the talent brand of the firm. We’ve seen it done in some firms already because it is critical to building the next generation of leaders and onboarding the right people.

Partners aren’t involved in the interview or onboarding process.
In an emerging leaders panel at Winning Is Everything 2015, new hires were asked why they chose their firm. Respondents said that at some point in their interview process, they were told exactly what they needed to do to get to partner. They could see a well-outlined path for their future and felt they could get there at that firm. Candidates also want to meet the partners, or at least know they exist outside of their website bios. After all, the partners are often the face of the firm. Make sure they’re part of the interview or onboarding process so candidates feel connected to the firm right away.

No career pages online or minimal content.
Filling your careers page with generic copy is a waste of valuable real estate. Make candidates dig for information and you risk having them bounce off of your website. How can you tell if this is happening? Check your analytics and look for trends in your careers pages. Also, don’t just talk about benefits such as health and dental insurance. Candidates assume you have them and can ask in the interview once they decide to consider you. Your careers page is an opportunity to show what sets your firm apart.

Specific charity or community involvement isn’t promoted publicly.
If your firm is involved in a specific charity or community project, it needs to be publicized in at least two places: your website and social media pages. While candidates will check out both options, cover all necessary channels by including photos and information on why your firm chose the cause. Bonus tip: share charity and community involvement (including photos) with trade publications. They’re often happy to share your efforts on their websites or social media pages, putting your firm in front of qualified candidates.

Need help spicing up your careers page, or using search engines like Google effectively to help recruit candidates? Contact me today to chat.


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